1. How To Manifest Everything That You Want...

Manifesting is the metaphysical art and science of how we can easily bring our desires into the physical world. It is natural process that involves a specific vibration of energy which you experience that will attract any heartfelt desire to you quickly and effortlessly! To start this process, you should think of something that you would like to have. Start from small things first because this will give you more faith as to that they will manifest. When you manifest small things, you will be able to gradually progress to bigger and bigger ones. Some fail to manifest because they want to get large amounts of money, houses or cars with their first intention. But that does not work this way because you cannot possibly completely believe that such big things will manifest when you are just a beginner. How to manifest your desires Slow Down, Relax and Fully Be Here Now. Being ever-present to this eternal moment is one of the most essential and basic key to manifesting. The mind will jump from past to the future and back again to the past, distracting you from the Infinite Source of power that is only here now. The entire Universe is happening only in this moment. If you are thinking about anything but this moment you are missing out on the Source that is connected to everyone and everything in it. The mind/ego is an extraordinary tool and is...

2. A Simple Guide to De-clutter Your Mind...

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo DaVinci. The goal of reducing clutter is to eliminate the non-essentials and keep only what is needed. If you are cleaning out your closet, this means deciding which pile each thing belongs in. But when it comes to the contents of your mind, the choice is where you place your attention. What do you want to feed with your most precious resource – your attention? We must however be aware that the beginning of any change and any new direction starts within. More accurately it starts with a thought. No matter what that new journey will be, no matter how far it will take us, that first step will quietly, occur within the realms of our own mind. An uncluttered mind is still and pristine like a mountain lake on a windless day. Even if a ripple appears, the tranquility remains, undisturbed. Your actions are clean and efficient. In the spaciousness, you notice creative impulses, novel ideas, and boundless peace. You feel light, calm, and alive. Mental Noise To a great extend, much of this can be classified as mental noise. We are forced to deal with it, blocking it out when we can, doing our best to filter out small pieces that are actually useful to us. We as humans were simply not designed to deal with this much information all at once. This noise keeps us at a disadvantage. It...

3. Develop Critical Thinking Skills: Cross Examination Debates...

Develop Critical Thinking Skills: Cross Examination Debates Author: Alhambra14 Published in: Oral Language Developing Critical Thinking Skills: Cross Examination DebateBy Reed Markham, Daytona State College Debating current issues is a great way to develop a student’s critical thinking skills and maximize student participation in the classroom.  Successful debates involve the selection of audience centered topics.  In preparation for the debates students utilize research from library databases and the internet.  On the day of the debate students should bring copies of research, notes, and speech outlines. A basic format for the Cross Examination Debate includes the following: Participants: 2 teams- Affirmative and Negative (2 students in each team) Class -debate judges Room setup: Two tables, podium in the center, student debaters face the audience Format: The constructive speech is designed to give students an opportunity to prepare an extemporaneous speech using the Toulmin Model of Argumentation. First Affirmative Constructive speech (6 minutes) Outline format: Attention getting introduction Debate Resolution Definitions- key terms in the debate resolution Body- utilize a modified Toulmin Model containing a claim statement, evidence (sources must be cited), and impact (personal opinion describing the significance of the argument).  Three claims must be presented. Conclusion- brief conclusion summarizing key arguments and concluding with an attention getter.   Cross Examination (3 minutes) by a member of the Negative team- each participant is expected to participate as a questioner and as a respondent during the debate. First Negative Constructive speech...

4. Why it’s never to late to go back to School...

Why it’s never to late to go back to School Author: jasonw93 Published in: Essays on Teaching The public perception of a person’s path through Toronto education has for the longest time been “one then done,” with every student following the same basic route: High school, post-secondary, and then onto the workforce, without a glance back. The idea of continuing education, or further education later in life carries certain stigmas around it which should be dispelled. There are many benefits to pursuing education further down the road. It can enhance your life, it can forward your career, and it can be done on your terms, without disturbing the life you already lead. Let’s take a closer look at these benefits: The world is changing, and it pays to keep up Really, you should never stop learning. The world advances and evolves, and it can benefit you to stay current. More importantly, though, you may have to. As the times change, so does what you need to know to stay on the job. What you learned when you were in school may now be less relevant to your career, and keeping abreast of the technology and practices of your organization is a never-ending process.If you’re in engineering, or machines, or computing, or anything else involving technology, it’s particularly essential to learn about the latest developments, and the practices that go with them. After all, if there’s one constant to technology,...

5. 8 Important Reasons For Teaching Kindness in Modern Schools System...

8 Important Reasons For Teaching Kindness in Modern Schools System   Author: RippleKindness Published in: Character Education Most people have heard the phrase ‘random acts of kindness’, which refers to a selfless act of giving resulting in the happiness of another person. Terms like this are increasing in popularity around the world, as more people identify a deficiency in their lives that can only be fulfilled by altruism.It seems we just can’t get enough of those addictive feel good emotions and with good reason.   Scientific studies have shown that kindness has a great number of physical and emotional benefits, and that children require a healthy dose of the warm and fuzzies in order to flourish as health, happy, well-rounded individuals.   Patty O’Grady, PhD, is an expert in the area of neuroscience, emotional learning, and positive psychology with special attention to the educational arena. She believes that “kindness changes the brain by the experience of kindness. Children and adolescents do not learn kindness by only thinking about it and talking about it. Kindness is best learned by feeling it so that they can reproduce it. Kindness is an emotion that students feel and empathy is a strength that they share.”   A great number of benefits have been reported to support the theory of teaching kindness in schools:   1. Happy Children Science explains that the good feelings we experience when being kind are produced by endorphins that...
More TV in the Classroom Please

More TV in the Classroom Please

More TV in the Classroom Please: Author: Calib Sael Published in: ESL Growing up in Puerto Rico means being strongly influenced by American culture probably more than in any other part of the world. Radio stations constantly play American music, and the TV is full of American programs; most of them dubbed since Spanish is the first language of the majority.  One of my favorite forms of entertainment is going to the movies, which in Puerto Rico is a completely different experience. Most movies in cinemas in Puerto Rico have subtitles in Spanish and are rarely dubbed (except for children’s movies). This meant reading the dialogue in Spanish while simultaneously listening to it in English. As a beginner reader, this proved to be a challenge. Trying to read the words before they disappear forever from the screen was a race against my reading skills I usually lost. But little by little, as my skills got better, I got to the point of being able to understand a whole movie. What a triumph that was! But then my journey switched, and that fluency reading practice became one of the best English teachers I ever had, which says a lot since children in Puerto Rico take English as a core subject ...
Speech Visual Preview Activity

Speech Visual Preview Activity

Speech Visual Preview Activity: The Speech Preview Project:  Developing more effective visuals for a presentation By Reed Markham, Daytona State College Can you imagine viewing a speech about a diesel engine without a visual aid? How about a speech about music therapy without some music? Can you imagine observing a speech on diet fads with elaborate posters, book covers, and health products displayed and the speaker fails to discuss the visuals during the presentation?  What are the best type of visuals for a speech? The most successful speakers in America today use visuals in their presentations- Oprah Winfrey, Dr. Oz, Bill Gates, Tony Robbins to name a few. But for many speakers a visual is an afterthought. Some speakers fail to create an eye catching visual. Some speakers fail to practice their speech with a visual. We live in a visual generation. Today’s public audiences pay more attention to visuals. High quality visuals are essential to public speaking success. The Speech Visual Preview project is designed to help students prepare for their informative or persuasive speech presentations. Visual aids can spice up any presentation. The old cliché that a picture is a thousand words is often true. Research shows that the use of professional visuals will increase your credibility...
Aberystwyth University

Aberystwyth University

Aberystwyth University: Aberystwyth University (Welsh: Prifysgol Aberystwyth) is a public research university located in Aberystwyth, Wales. Aberystwyth was a founding Member Institution of the former federal University of Wales. There are over 7,500 students in the University’s three main faculties of arts, social science and the sciences. Founded in 1872 as University College Wales, Aberystwyth it became a founder member of the University of Wales in 1894 and changed its name to the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. In the mid-1990s, the university again changed its name to the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. On 1 September 2007, the University of Wales ceased to be a federal university and Aberystwyth became independent again. Aberystwyth University was ranked between the 601-650 bracket in the world by the QS World University Rankings. The Guardian University League Table 2015 ranks Aberystwyth 106th out of 116 UK universities, the 2014 table having ranked it 88th in the UK. The Complete University Guide’s 2015 table ranks Aberystwyth 87th out of 123 British universities, History The University was founded in 1872 as University College Wales. The first Principal was Thomas Charles Edwards and initially there were 26 students. Before 1894, when the college joined the University of Wales as a founder member, students were submitted for...
Bangor University

Bangor University

Bangor University: Bangor University (Welsh: Prifysgol Bangor) is a Welsh university in the city of Bangor in the county of Gwynedd in North Wales. It received its Royal Charter in 1885 and was one of the founding member institutions of the former federal University of Wales. It was officially known for most of its history as the University of Wales, Bangor (UWB) (Welsh: Prifysgol Cymru, Bangor). From September 2007 it became known as Bangor University, having become independent from the federal University of Wales. In 2012 Bangor was ranked 251st among the world’s top universities. According to the Sunday Times University Guide 2012,it is rated top in Wales for teaching excellence and is among the top 15 universities in the UK in this category. Bangor University (Welsh: Prifysgol Bangor) is a Welsh university in the city of Bangor in the county of Gwynedd in North Wales. It received its Royal Charter in 1885 and was one of the founding member institutions of the former federal University of Wales. It was officially known for most of its history as the University of Wales, Bangor (UWB) (Welsh: Prifysgol Cymru, Bangor). From September 2007 it became known as Bangor University, having become independent from the federal University of Wales. In 2012 Bangor...
Cardiff University

Cardiff University

Cardiff University: Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a public research university located in Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. The University is composed of three colleges: Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; Biomedical and Life Sciences; and Physical Sciences and Engineering. Founded in 1883 as the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire, it becam e one of the founding colleges of the University of Wales in 1893, and in 1999 became an independent University awarding its own degrees. It is the second oldest university in Wales. It is a member of the Russell Group of leading British research universities.The university is consistently recognised as providing high quality research-based university education and is ranked 123 of the world’s top universities by the QS World University Rankings, as well as achieving the highest student satisfaction rating in the 2013 National Student Survey for universities in Wales. The University has an undergraduate enrollment of 20,611 and a total enrollment of 27,774, making it one of the largest universities in Wales. The Cardiff University Students’ Union works to promote the interests of the student body within the University and further afield. The University’s sports teams compete in the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) leagues. History Discussions regarding the founding of a college in...
Glyndŵr University

Glyndŵr University

Glyndŵr University: Glyndŵr University (Welsh: Prifysgol Glyndŵr, Welsh pronunciation: [priːvˈəsɡɔl ɡlɨnˈduːr]) is a British university with campuses at Wrexham, Northop and St Asaph in north-east Wales; and at Elephant and Castle, London. It offers both undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, as well as professional courses. GU has approximately 9,000 students. Formerly known as the North East Wales Institute of Higher Education (NEWI), it was granted full university status in 2008 after being a member of the University of Wales since 2003. The university is named after the medieval Welsh prince Owain Glyndŵr, who first suggested the establishment of universities throughout Wales in the early 15th century. In June 2014 the university was suspended from recruiting students from outside the UK. This followed an investigation into students who had obtained fraudulent English language qualifications in order to gain admission to the university. An investigation is currently underway and a task force has been established with the aim of getting the suspension lifted History The university’s origins date back to the opening of Wrexham School of Science and Art (WSSA) in 1887. At this time Viriamu Jones called for a University of Wales.[citation needed] The WSSA began offering University of London-validated degrees in science in 1924. The original name of Wrexham School of...
Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama

Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama...

Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama: The Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama (Welsh: Coleg Brenhinol Cerdd a Drama Cymru) is a conservatoire located in Cardiff, Wales. The College was established in 1949 as Cardiff College of Music at Cardiff Castle, but has since moved to purpose-built accommodation within the castle grounds of Bute Park near Cardiff University. It later changed its name to the Welsh College of Music & Drama before being awarded its Royal title in The Queen’s Golden Jubilee in 2002, making it the fifth conservatoire to be awarded this title. From its opening, the College’s degrees were awarded by the University of Wales and in 2004 the C ollege became part of the federal university. In 2007, however, it left the university and became a limited company under the University of South Wales Group, with its degrees now awarded by the University of South Wales[1]. The college provides education and training in the performing arts, with approximately two-thirds of its 550 students studying music-related courses and the rest studying drama-related courses. It was the first and is only one of two All-Steinway conservatoires in the UK, along with Leeds College of Music. Postgraduate degrees The College also offers postgraduate degrees in the following...
Swansea University

Swansea University

Swansea University: Swansea University (Welsh: Prifysgol Abertawe) is a public research university located in Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom. Swansea University was chartered as University College of Swansea in 1920, as the fourth college of the University of Wales. In 1996, it changed its name to the University of Wales Swansea following structural changes within the University of Wales. The new title of Swansea University was formally adopted on 1 September 2007 when the University of Wales became a non-membership confederal institution and the former members became universities in their own right. It is the third largest university in Wales in terms of number of students. The university campus is located next to the coast at the north of Swansea Bay, east of the Gower Peninsula, in the grounds of Singleton Park, just outside Swansea city centre. Swansea was granted its own degree-awarding powers in 2005 in preparation for possible changes within the University of Wales. Swansea and Cardiff University compete in an annual varsity match, known as the Welsh version of the Oxbridge event, which includes the Welsh Varsity rugby and The Welsh Boat Race. Organisation and administration Governance Singleton Abbey: The administrative building of the University Swansea received its royal charter in 1920 and like many universities is...
Swansea Metropolitan University

Swansea Metropolitan University

Swansea Metropolitan University Swansea Metropolitan University (Welsh: Prifysgol Metropolitan Abertawe) is a university campus of University of Wales, Trinity Saint David based in Swansea, Wales, UK. Swansea Metropolitan University has been a major centre for the delivery of vocational higher education since 1853. The University employs more than 500 staff and teaches more than 6,000 students. The University was formed from the three former Swansea colleges of Art, Teacher Education and Technology which were founded in 1853, 1872 and 1897 respectively. On 1 August 2013 Swansea Metropolitan University merged with University of Wales, Trinity Saint David to become the Swansea Metropolitan campus of UWTSD History The university has seen a significant evolution in its history over the past 150+ years. For most of the 20th century there were – in addition to Swansea University – three separate further educational institutions serving the city of Swansea: the Swansea (Municipal) School of Art and Crafts (established in 1853); the Swansea College of Education (established in 1872) and Swansea Technical College (established in 1897). During this time, the School of Art and Crafts, one of the oldest in Britain, was based on Alexandra Road not far from its present location at the bottom of Mount Pleasant Hill opposite Swansea Central Police Station....
Trinity University College

Trinity University College

Trinity University College: Trinity University College (Welsh: Coleg Prifysgol y Drindod) was a Church University College in Carmarthen, Wales. In 2010, it merged with the University of Wales, Lampeter to become the new University of Wales, Trinity Saint David. The institution was founded in 1848 as the South Wales and Monmouthshire Training College. History Trinity University College began life in 1848 as the South Wales and Monmouthshire Training College, making it the oldest teacher training college in continuous operation in Wales. The college’s role was to train young men for teaching in Church primary schools. In the first year of operation, 22 students were recruited and were taught by three members of staff including the first Principal, William Reed. Walter Powell is recorded as the first student; he was 17, previously a draper and worked in a grocery store. The College required its students to follow a strict schedule which included getting up at half past six for a cold bath. Students were often recruited from humble backgrounds, and to remind them of this, the college curriculum included subjects such as gardening and woodwork. The students were expected to have a knowledge of grammar and arithmetic and received education in Latin and Greek. By 1936, the college also had...

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Falcon Education Consultancy

Falcon Education Consultancy was established in 1992. It represents as many as 26 prestigious Institutions of United Kingdom (UK). Falcon provides counseling to students from all over the world, especially from Pakistan, Bangladesh and India. It has so far placed more than 12,000 students in various universities of high repute in UK. A team of fully trained professionals and friendly staff, at all the FEC offices, promptly responds to students query and provides any information regarding study opportunities abroad.

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Why it’s never to late to go back to School