1. How To Manifest Everything That You Want...

Manifesting is the metaphysical art and science of how we can easily bring our desires into the physical world. It is natural process that involves a specific vibration of energy which you experience that will attract any heartfelt desire to you quickly and effortlessly! To start this process, you should think of something that you would like to have. Start from small things first because this will give you more faith as to that they will manifest. When you manifest small things, you will be able to gradually progress to bigger and bigger ones. Some fail to manifest because they want to get large amounts of money, houses or cars with their first intention. But that does not work this way because you cannot possibly completely believe that such big things will manifest when you are just a beginner. How to manifest your desires Slow Down, Relax and Fully Be Here Now. Being ever-present to this eternal moment is one of the most essential and basic key to manifesting. The mind will jump from past to the future and back again to the past, distracting you from the Infinite Source of power that is only here now. The entire Universe is happening only in this moment. If you are thinking about anything but this moment you are missing out on the Source that is connected to everyone and everything in it. The mind/ego is an extraordinary tool and is...

2. A Simple Guide to De-clutter Your Mind...

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo DaVinci. The goal of reducing clutter is to eliminate the non-essentials and keep only what is needed. If you are cleaning out your closet, this means deciding which pile each thing belongs in. But when it comes to the contents of your mind, the choice is where you place your attention. What do you want to feed with your most precious resource – your attention? We must however be aware that the beginning of any change and any new direction starts within. More accurately it starts with a thought. No matter what that new journey will be, no matter how far it will take us, that first step will quietly, occur within the realms of our own mind. An uncluttered mind is still and pristine like a mountain lake on a windless day. Even if a ripple appears, the tranquility remains, undisturbed. Your actions are clean and efficient. In the spaciousness, you notice creative impulses, novel ideas, and boundless peace. You feel light, calm, and alive. Mental Noise To a great extend, much of this can be classified as mental noise. We are forced to deal with it, blocking it out when we can, doing our best to filter out small pieces that are actually useful to us. We as humans were simply not designed to deal with this much information all at once. This noise keeps us at a disadvantage. It...

3. Develop Critical Thinking Skills: Cross Examination Debates...

Develop Critical Thinking Skills: Cross Examination Debates Author: Alhambra14 Published in: Oral Language Developing Critical Thinking Skills: Cross Examination DebateBy Reed Markham, Daytona State College Debating current issues is a great way to develop a student’s critical thinking skills and maximize student participation in the classroom.  Successful debates involve the selection of audience centered topics.  In preparation for the debates students utilize research from library databases and the internet.  On the day of the debate students should bring copies of research, notes, and speech outlines. A basic format for the Cross Examination Debate includes the following: Participants: 2 teams- Affirmative and Negative (2 students in each team) Class -debate judges Room setup: Two tables, podium in the center, student debaters face the audience Format: The constructive speech is designed to give students an opportunity to prepare an extemporaneous speech using the Toulmin Model of Argumentation. First Affirmative Constructive speech (6 minutes) Outline format: Attention getting introduction Debate Resolution Definitions- key terms in the debate resolution Body- utilize a modified Toulmin Model containing a claim statement, evidence (sources must be cited), and impact (personal opinion describing the significance of the argument).  Three claims must be presented. Conclusion- brief conclusion summarizing key arguments and concluding with an attention getter.   Cross Examination (3 minutes) by a member of the Negative team- each participant is expected to participate as a questioner and as a respondent during the debate. First Negative Constructive speech...

4. Why it’s never to late to go back to School...

Why it’s never to late to go back to School Author: jasonw93 Published in: Essays on Teaching The public perception of a person’s path through Toronto education has for the longest time been “one then done,” with every student following the same basic route: High school, post-secondary, and then onto the workforce, without a glance back. The idea of continuing education, or further education later in life carries certain stigmas around it which should be dispelled. There are many benefits to pursuing education further down the road. It can enhance your life, it can forward your career, and it can be done on your terms, without disturbing the life you already lead. Let’s take a closer look at these benefits: The world is changing, and it pays to keep up Really, you should never stop learning. The world advances and evolves, and it can benefit you to stay current. More importantly, though, you may have to. As the times change, so does what you need to know to stay on the job. What you learned when you were in school may now be less relevant to your career, and keeping abreast of the technology and practices of your organization is a never-ending process.If you’re in engineering, or machines, or computing, or anything else involving technology, it’s particularly essential to learn about the latest developments, and the practices that go with them. After all, if there’s one constant to technology,...

5. 8 Important Reasons For Teaching Kindness in Modern Schools System...

8 Important Reasons For Teaching Kindness in Modern Schools System   Author: RippleKindness Published in: Character Education Most people have heard the phrase ‘random acts of kindness’, which refers to a selfless act of giving resulting in the happiness of another person. Terms like this are increasing in popularity around the world, as more people identify a deficiency in their lives that can only be fulfilled by altruism.It seems we just can’t get enough of those addictive feel good emotions and with good reason.   Scientific studies have shown that kindness has a great number of physical and emotional benefits, and that children require a healthy dose of the warm and fuzzies in order to flourish as health, happy, well-rounded individuals.   Patty O’Grady, PhD, is an expert in the area of neuroscience, emotional learning, and positive psychology with special attention to the educational arena. She believes that “kindness changes the brain by the experience of kindness. Children and adolescents do not learn kindness by only thinking about it and talking about it. Kindness is best learned by feeling it so that they can reproduce it. Kindness is an emotion that students feel and empathy is a strength that they share.”   A great number of benefits have been reported to support the theory of teaching kindness in schools:   1. Happy Children Science explains that the good feelings we experience when being kind are produced by endorphins that...
University of Glamorgan

University of Glamorgan

University of Glamorgan: The University of Glamorgan (Welsh: Prifysgol Morgannwg) was a university based in South Wales prior to the merger that formed the University of South Wales in April 2013. The university was based in Pontypridd, Rhondda Cynon Taf with campuses in Trefforest, Glyntaff, Merthyr Tydfil, Tyn y Wern (The Glamorgan Sport Park) and Cardiff. The university had four faculties, and was the only university in Wales which had no link with the University of Wales. History The University of Glamorgan was founded in 1913 as a School of Mines based in Trefforest, Pontypridd, serving the large coal mining industry in the South Wales Valleys.[3] The school was owned and funded by the major Welsh coal owners, through a levy of one tenth of a penny on each ton of coal produced by the companies involved. At the outset, the school had 17 mining diploma students, including three from China. The school was taken over by Glamorgan County Council during the Depression, and became Glamorgan Technical College in 1949, reflecting its expanding portfolio, and the Glamorgan College of Technology in 1958. By this time, the institution had expanded to offer a range of full-time, sandwich and part-time courses in science, technology and commerce, to which it added the...
University of Wales Institute, Cardiff

University of Wales Institute, Cardiff

University of Wales Institute, Cardiff: Cardiff Metropolitan University (Welsh: Prifysgol Fetropolitan Caerdydd), formerly University of Wales Institute, Cardiff (UWIC), is a university situated in Cardiff. It operates from two campuses: Llandaff on Western Avenue and Cyncoed campus to the north-east of the city. The university has over 12,000 students. The university offers degree courses in a variety of disciplines. Study is available at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, full-time and part-time, and research opportunities are offered. Cardiff Metropolitan University has a number of research and enterprise centres, including the Food Industry Centre, the Welsh Centre for Tourism Research, and the National Centre for Product Design and Development Research. Cardiff Metropolitan University has been independently acclaimed for its academic standards, with its most recent QAA Institutional Report (2008) stating that ‘confidence can be placed in the soundness of the institution’s current and likely future management of the quality of its programmes and of the academic standards of the associated awards. 1865 – The School of Art opened in the Old Free Library Building, St Mary’s Street. 1900– School of Art moved to the Technical Buildings in Dumfries Place. 1940 – (circa) Cardiff College of Food Technology and Commerce opened at Crwys Road. 1949 – The School of Art moved to The...
University of Wales, Lampeter

University of Wales, Lampeter

University of Wales, Lampeter University of Wales, Lampeter (Welsh: Prifysgol Cymru, Llanbedr Pont Steffan) was a university in Lampeter, Wales. Founded in 1822 by royal charter, it was the oldest degree awarding institution in Wales and was the third oldest in England and Wales after Oxford and Cambridge. In 2010 it merged with Trinity University College (under its 1822 charter) to create the University of Wales, Trinity Saint David. The university was founded in as St David’s College (Coleg Dewi Sant), becoming St David’s University College (Coleg Prifysgol Dewi Sant) in 1971, when it became part of the federal University of Wales. With fewer than 2,000 students on campus, it was often claimed to be one of the smallest public universities in Europe. When Thomas Burgess was appointed Bishop of St David’s in 1803, he saw a need for a college in which Welsh ordinands could receive a higher education. The existing colleges at Oxford and Cambridge were out of the geographical and financial means of most would-be students. Burgess had no Welsh connections; he was born in England in 1756 and, after Winchester and Oxford, he had short stays in Salisbury and Durham before being appointed to his first bishopric in Wales in 1803. Burgess intended to build...
University of Wales, Newport

University of Wales, Newport

University of Wales, Newport The University of Wales, Newport (Welsh: Prifysgol Cymru, Casnewydd) was a university based in Newport, South Wales prior to the merger that formed the University of South Wales in April 2013. The university has two campuses in Newport; Caerleon on the northern outskirts of the city and a £35 million campus on the east bank of the River Usk in Newport city centre opened in 2011. In 2012 the university was ranked 111th out of 120 UK universities in the Guardian League Table for university rankings,[2] 105th out of 116 in The Complete University Guide[3] and 104th out of 116 UK universities in the Times Good University Guide. Newport has been involved in higher education since 1841. Originally a Mechanics Institute, set up to provide further education for workers and tradesmen, the institution was based in Newport’s Town Hall on Commercial Street. Working men and women were able to attend a variety of lectures for two shilling per quarter to study subjects including The Pursuit of Attainment and Knowledge and Popular Superstition. The institution was later formed as Gwent College of Higher Education by a merger of the Caerleon College of Education (the former Monmouthshire Training College), the Newport College of Art and Design and...

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Falcon Education Consultancy

Falcon Education Consultancy was established in 1992. It represents as many as 26 prestigious Institutions of United Kingdom (UK). Falcon provides counseling to students from all over the world, especially from Pakistan, Bangladesh and India. It has so far placed more than 12,000 students in various universities of high repute in UK. A team of fully trained professionals and friendly staff, at all the FEC offices, promptly responds to students query and provides any information regarding study opportunities abroad.

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Why it’s never to late to go back to School